Whats your Style?

Posted: October 16, 2010 in Flavor Series

Today is hopefully a perfect fall day, Mid-October, Mid 50’s-Mid 60’s, sunny, leaves beginning to change, a great day to enjoy a fall beer. Maybe a Pumpkin Ale or perhaps your favorite breweries October-fest brew. While thinking about this I decided it is a prime time to discuss beer styles. What do I mean, when I say beer style? I am referring more to its type as classified by flavor: IPA, Belgian White, American Lager, I think you get the point. In order to discuss a classification, we must once again discuss a little history. In 1977 Michael Jackson (not the king of pop) wrote the world guide to beer, which is used today to classify most beer into categories based on location of brew and local names used for them.
Essentially beer is broken down by flavors, such as bitterness, caused by the amount of hops, sweetness for the amount of residual sugars. Strength, how much alcohol is actually in the beer, as well as its viscosity. And lastly its appearance which consists of: color, tint, head, and lacing (what is left on the glass once the head dissolves). Brew masters around the world could go so in-depth with breakdown and classifications of beer, based on these categories that you could write a book, and many have, just look on Amazon. As I began to brain storm ideas for this post, I decided it would be best to do as a series, so over the next week or so we will cover some of the more popular beer styles out there today, I will give some of my suggestions and encourage you to make some suggestions of your own.

Cheers

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